Undergraduate Programs: Information and Objectives

The Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering offers both fundamental and advanced courses that prepare students for careers in the engineering profession or for advanced study at the graduate level. Two ABET-accredited majors, one in mechanical engineering and the other in industrial engineering, as well as the major in engineering management, constitute the department's degree programs.

The former two lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, while the latter leads to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Management. Students entering the department should consult their assigned advisor in selecting their courses to satisfy the degree requirement of 128 hours in these majors.

To learn more about the department's undergraduate programs, please visit the MIE Undergraduate Catalog

Undergraduate students enrolled in ME and IE are required to take certain specific courses in order to graduate with a Bachelor's Degree. Learn more about required coursework and download the undergraduate syllabi for ME and IE: MIE Courses

MIE by the numbers: Learn more about MIE's Enrollment and Graduation Data

Program Educational Objectives and Outcomes

The program educational objectives for all MIE undergraduate programs are for its graduates to be able to achieve the following goals:

Mechanical Engineering Educational Objectives

1. To adeptly apply analytical, experimental, and computer tools in design and performance improvement of mechanical and thermal systems.

2. To effectively pursue ethically responsible professional growth through continued learning and by taking on different roles in multidisciplinary teams. (i.e., to become better engineers, both technically and in dealing with others)

3. To work successfully in many different situations and with many different kinds of people, and to adapt to changes in the workplace and in the world. (i.e., to be engineers who embrace diversity and change)

Additional criteria for graduates of the ME program:

a. Curriculum The curriculum must require students to apply principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics (including multivariate calculus and differential equations); to model, analyze, design, and realize physical systems, components or processes; and prepare students to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical systems areas.

b. Faculty The program must demonstrate that faculty members responsible for the upper-level professional program are maintaining currency in their specialty area.

Industrial Engineering Program Educational Objectives

1. To adeptly apply analytical, experimental, and computer tools in design and performance improvement of manufacturing and service systems.

2. To effectively pursue ethically responsible professional growth through continued learning and by taking on different roles in multidisciplinary teams. (i.e., to become better engineers, both technically and in dealing with others)

3. To work successfully in many different situations and with many different kinds of people, and to adapt to changes in the workplace and in the world. (i.e., to be engineers who embrace diversity and change)

Additional criteria for graduates of the IE program:

a. Curriculum The curriculum must prepare graduates to design, develop, implement, and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment and energy. The curriculum must include in-depth instruction to accomplish the integration of systems using appropriate analytical, computational, and experimental practices.

b. Faculty Evidence must be provided that the program faculty understand professional practice and maintain currency in their respective professional areas. Program faculty must have responsibility and sufficient authority to define, revise, implement, and achieve program objectives.

Expected Student Outcomes

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet the desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economical, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
 
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